Tag: people tree

PEOPLE TREE X VICTORIA & ALBERT MUSEUM COLLABORATION

For Autumn Winter 2017, People Tree has designed a unique and feminine eight piece capsule collection in conjunction with the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Inspired by the 1930’s, this limited edition collection is based on fashionable patterns of the era, celebrating the heritage of the thirties with a contemporary twist. Key to the collection are romantic long and lean shapes with subtle ruffle details. The prints are based on dress fabrics from 1934, originally by the Calico Printer’s Association in Manchester, England and are now held in archive at the V&A Museum.

Seed print story features four designs in 100% organic certified cotton – a ruffle dress, ruffle back shirt, coat dress and wide leg trouser.

Tulip print story features four designs in 100% Tencel® – ruffle back jumpsuit, smock dress, peplum top and maxi skirt. Tencel® is a luxury cellulose fibre made from wood pulp. The fibre production is extremely eco-friendly due to the closed loop manufacturing system used.

All styles of the collaboration are made by Creative Handicrafts, based in India. Founded in 1984, this dynamic organisation helps low income women in the slums of Mumbai achieve economic independence by training and creating jobs.

Delivery in July 2017.

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BEHIND THE SEAMS: ORGANIC GARMENT MANUFACTURING IN DELHI

Rajlakshmi Cotton Mills is a pioneer in organic garment manufacturing in India and is People Tree’s production partner for a large part of the knitted organic cotton pieces in their collections.

When we were in India Mr. Sanjay showed us around the two multiple stories Rajlakshmi factories he manages in Delhi.  We were guided through the production process floor by floor, as at both premises every floor houses a different department. 

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First a bit of history: Rajlakshmi Cotton Mills is a family business, which was founded in 1932 in Calcutta. In those days Rajlakshmi was specialised in making yarns and selling fabrics and later on developed into a company that produces high quality textiles, from fashion to bed linen. The company is located in Calcutta and in Delhi. 

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Mr. Sanjay explains us that in 2000 the owners of the company realised that running an ethical business and taking care of the environment is also good for business.

‘People want to know where the clothes they buy have been made and they don’t want to feel guilty’.

The last 15 years the company started to work backwards in the supply chain to make every step in the production process as fair and sustainable as possible. Rajlakshmi became the first Indian factory with a Fair Trade certification and is also organic certified.

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Mr. Sanjay tells us that the factory receives mainly production request from ‘smaller’ companies.

‘The costs for an organic and fair product are higher so making an organic product is not so high on the agenda of the bigger brands. But we realised this before we started to go in the organic business as we knew we would be more expensive and we would have a slow growth. It takes time for companies to pick up on this. But the environment has been exploited very badly and we believe the day will come where everybody will say enough is enough.’ 

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Although Rajlakshmi is mainly working with the ‘smaller’ brands at the moment, the size, facilities and neat organiation would suggest oherwise. Mr. Sanjay prefers quality over quantity though and chooses his partners carefully. 

At Rajlakshmi we work together with brands who share the same vision, like People Tree. Story telling is important, I believe that people who know about what’s going on behind the scenes of the fashion industry won’t run away from their responsibility.’

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When we ask Mr. Sanjay about how he feels about certifications he explains that an organic certificate can’t guarantee everything.

‘It is also about trust, having an ethical mind and humanising a company. One of the things I try to teach the people in the factory is not the be scared and to be honest about how their work is going. I believe that you can solve 9 out of 10 problems by being transparent. In our culture we are taught that saying no is a bad thing. But people will respect each other and take care of each other more when you are transparent.’

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One of the brands we produce for is a Fair Trade USA member, meaning a 5% premium is paid on everything they buy from our factory. A committee, which is operated by workers decides where these premiums are spend on.

A few examples of what the premiums have been spent on so far are induction plates + utensils and monthly health kits.

If the premiums are spend in a good way this is also good for the business.  I used to receive about 10 applications a day from workers who coudn’t come to work because they needed to get cooking gas.’

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Rajlakshmi was the first company in metropolitan area of Delhi to offer this Fair Trade premium.

Rajlakshmi works together with Chetna Organic to ensure Fair Trade is practiced throughout the supply chain right down to the cotton farmers. Chetna Organic works with marginalised farmers from Maharashtra, Odessa and Andhra Pradesh towards improving their livelihoods and making farming a sustainable occupation.

Together with the Chetna project, Rajlakshmi has helped to set up many vocational training centres for women in rural farming villages. This educational training and support enables women become more financially secure.

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In addition to this Rajlakshmi has sponsored organic vegetable gardens in local schools, as well as contributing to more advanced school facilities such as science laboratories.

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BEHIND THE SEAMS: CREATIVE HANDICRAFTS EMPOWERS WOMEN IN SLUM COMMUNITIES IN MUMBAI

Mumbai, known as the financial centre of India, but also a city of immense poverty. Roughly half of the metropolitan area’s 22 million people live in informal settlements, or slums

Although India is developing fast, the increased wealth doesn’t reach the poorest of the poor. One of the causes is social discrimation, still rooted in the country’s culture. 

One of People Tree‘s production partners, Creative Handicrafts, is a social enterprise founded in the slums of Mumbai with the aim to build sustainable communities where respect for people is held high and there is no differentiation based on caste, gender or religion.  

We visited the Creative Handicrafts Head quarters, which moved to a nice office building in Mumbai 5 years ago and a few of the production facilities still located in the slums.

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Mr. Johny Joseph joined Creative Handicrafts in 1999 and explained us a bit more about the history of Creative Handicrafts first. 

Creative Handicrafts was founded by Sister Isabel Martin, who during her work in Mumbai felt the suffering of the women, uneducated and unemployed. She felt the best way to help people overcome poverty was to provide them with the opportunity to work. In 1984, she started Creative Handicrafts, training poor women to make toys, bags and home textiles.

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Today, Creative Handicrafts provides training to the women to produce garments and fabric handicrafts and to market their goods to earn a living.

Creative Handicrafts currently employs over 300 women. Before the ladies start in the so-called Cut, Make and Trim departments they get a 6 months training  to learn all the tailoring skills.

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A lot of women want to work with Creative Handicrafts but there are two criteria, which might sound a bit odd, but unfortunately this is the situation for a lot of women living in Indian slums. These criteria are that the women: 1. Have a difficult life situation and 2. Have no skills. 

This difficult life situation often hasn’t only to do with being poor and living in the slums but also with the fact that they have an abusive husband or a husband with an alcohol problem. It’s important for these women to be able to take care of themselves and their families, without being dependant on their husbands.

 

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Women who do not make the grade as tailors aren’t sent back on the streets but they are trained in cooking to join The Lunch Box Catering Project. This project is supplying lunches to hundreds of office workers around Mumbai.  The Lunch Box Catering Project is located in the Creative Handicrafts Head Quarters, which houses a professional kitchen.  

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The Creative Handicrafts HQ is very modern and they work with the newest textile techniques.

‘Fair Trade or not, it’s trade!’ Mr. Johny Joseph explains. ‘We can not compromise on quality, nor on style or delivery.’

‘When I started here in 1999 it was a question of make or break and we had to change the kind of products we were making to be able to guarantee the demand from our international customers and our long term growth.’

People Tree started to work with Creative Handicrafts in 2011 and together they have developed a new organic cotton collection.

To guarantee the quality all of the product development, pattern and sample making is done at the Creative Handicrafts HQ by highly skilled tailors and garment techs. From here the pattern parts and technical drawings are divided over the cooperations in the slums.

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When we were there they were working on the latest People Tree collection, made of the sustainable fabric Tencel®. 

This fabric is new for Creative Handicrafts and People Tree is currently running a crowdfund campaign to start a production line of this new innovative fabric at Creative Handicrafts.

Working with Tencel® is a chance to up skill the workers and provide them with a greater range of fabrics they can offer to their clients, providing more business opportunities and, eventually, more job opportunities within the community.

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The cooperatives where the actual production takes place are located in the slums.

‘It’s a terrible logistic nightmare of course but it’s so valuable to be there’.  ‘We want to reach the women where they are and it’s important for the women to be able to stay close to their families.’ Mr. Johny Joseph explains:

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Many of the hundreds of women who work for Creative Handicrafts are the main bread winners for their families.

Creative Handicrafts runs a crèche, providing day care for the toddlers of working mothers living in the slums.

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Being in the slums and facing poverty straight in the eye we had a very open discussion with Mr. Johny Joseph about whether the women are really able to work their way out of poverty. Even if they receive a fair wage…..

His honest answer was no; ‘It’s still not enough, even though it is Fair Trade. You have to realise that the background the women come from is not so great and they still receive low wages. You have to imagine that most of the time they live in a room of two by two meters in a not so nice environment, not suitable for studying for example. Working for a fair wage gives them an opportunity to be able to besides feeding their families rent a small house (still in the slums but safe and ‘private’) for their family. Their children can go to school, these are English schools and good schools – my children go to the same schools. Basically earning a fair wage enables them to give their children a better chance for a future out of poverty.’

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Further reads and information about Creative Handicrafts and People Tree:

 

 

KTS – HAND KNITS FROM NEPAL

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Today we visited the Kumbeshwar Technical School (KTS) in Kathmandu, Nepal. KTS has been a long time production partner of True Fashion label People Tree. The beautiful hand knitted jumpers and cardigans in the People Tree collections are made by KTS. The son of the founder, MR. Kiran Khadgi and now director of the organization welcomed us in his office and proudly explained us everything about the history of KTS.  

KTS was originally set up by his father, a dedicated freedom fighter to help pode people, the so-called ‘untouchable’ caste in Nepal. Those born into the pode caste are expected to clean the sewers and streets of the areas inhabited by higher castes for no more than scraps of leftover food. The discrimination that keeps these people out of other forms of work even affects children, who may drop out of primary school because they are unable to fit in. Until recently, pode children did not go to school at all.

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People Tree works with KTS to provide training and design support. Hand knitting not only makes a unique and beautiful product, it also provides women with the opportunity to work. Many of the artisans at KTS are mothers and university students who use their income to finance their – and their children’s – education and living costs. Mr Khadgi explained that KTS wants to create an environment where people feel safe and welcome and take care of each other. Not only with providing jobs and economic benefits but also with important educational programs and things like health insurances for all the people who work at KTS.

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Women who want to become a skilled hand knitter are offered a 3 months course by KTS. The women who work in the KTS office can bring their children to the in house daycare centre or when they are older to the school. Some women come and pick up their work at the KTS office and do the hand knitting work at home. In the more rural areas a group leader makes sure the hand knit orders are divided amongst the ladies who work on the ordered hand knit styles from their homes.

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In addition to providing good jobs for thousands of people, KTS puts profits from Fair Trade back into community development. KTS supports an orphanage and a school providing an education to over 250 children from low-income families. KTS provides underprivileged women, disabled people and widows with vocational training and job opportunities. KTS provides medical and social support and offers children’s and adult’s literacy classes.

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We are incredibly inspired by the work of this Kathmandu based non profit organisation and are proud to be working with them. We already loved the hand knit styles they make for the People Tree collections and now even more so after seeing with our own eyes how much good can be accomplished when organisations look further than economic gain only – especially in a country like Nepal, which is one of the poorest countries in the world.